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of state, and former ambassador to the u.n.. dr. albright. [applause] sandy burger, former national security adviser to president clinton. sandy. [applause] leon feater, former national security adviser to vice president gore. [applause] nancy sotoburg former deputy national adviser to president clinton. [applause] and general wesley clark, former supreme allieded commander europe and director of strategic plans and policies for the joint chiefs of staff, general clark. [applause] i'd also like to recognize terry gardener, the director of the library. terry, thank you. [applause] joseph, the director of the cia information management services. [applause] skip rutherford, the dean of the public school of service. [applause] bruce lipped see, chairman of the board of the clinton foundation. [applause] former secretary of transportation rodney slater. [applause] and governor jim guy tucker. [applause] it is now my pleasure to introduce this. he was the deputy director intelligence of the cia. he was chairman of the national intelligence com and served as a assistant director of central
of state. that's not to mention if the 80 eminent people the ed of the eu or the u.n. logistically, very difficult. in terms of mandela, you know, what a man. i saw him many times. he had connections with gadhafi and castro. he really didn't care weather people were in favor in the western world or whether they were popular. he was very, very principled in the fact that if gadhafi, if the libyans or the cubans had given assistance to the anc in times of trouble, he felt loyal. he was very loyal to his friends. he would show the friendship back. what you are going to see is a mismatch of people. hemowho are celebrities, naomi campbell known for her temper and being a hot headed model sitting next to perhaps the head of iran. you know? there's a wonderful image when you can see about tomorrow. i think that is mandela as his p.a. said today, he's bringing people toothing in death as well as he did in life. >> we're looking at pictures of mandela dancing. he was somebody who celebrated life, as well, bringing so many people together. you just can't help but. >> i will and be inspired when yo
a strong u.n. mandate to protect civilians in this country. you can see that the airport is just completely empty. there's no civilian planes that are landing. there's a humanitarian crisis which is developing. thousands of people have come to the airport because they have nowhere else to go. seleka and anti-balaka are targetting people in their homes. this is the only place they feel safe. >> translation: everyone you see here is a christian. there are no muslims here, we have no application. the muslims have seleka to look after them. we are central africans but there's nobody to defend us. >> translation: we have nothing to drink, there's nothing to eat and we don't have money to buy anything. >> there are some international charities which are helping the people, but food and water are limited in the city. there are almost half a million people around the country who have lost their homes. >> the french sent a fighter plane that flew low over the city in a way to intimidate the seleka and anti-balaka fighters. the big question is when will these people be able to go home, will they want
and interreligious crimes that can degenerate. the security council and i welcome the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon who has given a mandate to re-establish order to protect the population and to insure stability that then lead to elections. >> more now on our top story. the death of nelson mandela. south africa's foreign minister. at mandela's insistence. he served in the first post apartheid government. >> that kept nelson mandela in jail, and he then served under mandela in south africa's first cabinet. it was his task to publicly defend the continued imprisonment of mandela and other political developments. privately he long lobbied for mandela's release. >> due to the effect that mandela ought to be released that we are making a bigger martyr of him every day that he stays in prison. and that is international acclaim. and it would be growing to an extent that we would not be able to hand it will any longer. unfortunately at that time it was. >> eight years later nelson mandela bake a free man. >> he spent 27 years in prison. and the day he was released he displayed the--he displayed the ac
.s. military is the strongest in the world. u.s. and n.a.t.o. leaders are meeting in bruls -- brussels hoping to percade hamid karzai to sign. keeping u.s. military troops past 2014. after a second day of talks, paul joins us. >> n.a.t.o. officials meet with afghan's foreign minister. could we be closer to a signature. >> i think the principal you have to think of when you talk about these meetings, is like an apple press. you tighten the pressure in the hope that the juice flows. there's a blockage in the pipeline. it is hamid karzai. he's not willing to sign the bilateral agreement. even john kerry will not speculate as to why he will not sign it. hamid karzai at the moment says no. susan rice went to kabul, he said no. as john kerry says on tuesday here in brussels, there are some 50 nations who are part of the effort to stablilize afghanistan. they have budgetary cycles, planning cycles, and you don't turn off military cycles like this. there has to be planning involved. n.a.t.o. says it needs the signature before the end of the year. n.a.t.o. officials said any signature will do. hamid k
under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he displayed the - he displayed the cuban and energy to the person. who has been a president before. amazing what this idea, in the minds of people and for that matter, into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the process, that led to a peaceful transfer of power, was nelson mandela's insistence that there need be no losers, that all could win. >> we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and
the tributes after ban ki-moon, the u.n. secretary general speaks, the tribute by foreign dignitaries, then the president of the united states, barack obama, followed by the leaders of brazil, china and india and then cuba. raul castro. they will all be on this little stage, this little area in front of 90,000 people who have gathered in the soccer stadium so there could be a moment where president obama and raul castro may shake hands, may talk, who knows. >> be interesting to watch if they shake hands. that was the big thing, the gore people wanted no physical contact or substantive communications because of the relationship between the two countries. obviously, you can get as close as we are at an event like that and we will see what happens. you watch something like that. for the former presidents to be together, you know this because you have been at big events, the opening of presidential libraries here at home, the king hussain funeral, you had a group like that. the pope john paul ii funeral, you had several presidents together. it's a security challenge, number one, then the
they give no credibility to this report whatsoever. they said, quote, pela who is the u.n. human rights chief has talked to, quote, nonsense in the past and they are sort of trying to brush this off but it is something will carry a lot of weight internationally. the united states nations head of human rights wants to take syria to the international criminal court and that would be something that would up the ante considerably, zoraida. >> thank you very much. frederik pleitgen reporting live for us in damascus. >>> allen gross was in prison four years ago in cuba. now in a new letter he appeals for president obama to personally intervene in his case saying extraordinary steps have been taken for other americans. the letter will be delivered today. part of a new strategy by his family to put direct pressure on the white house. a copy was given to "the washington post." >>> major snowstorm is set to hit part of the country! >> i know. it doesn't feel that like here. it's warm here. >> it is. indra petersons is covering that for us. >> i want to give you a jump-start. >> this is bad news?
inspectors from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog toured the heavy water reactor at iraq. a sign that while there's plenty of scepticism some progress was already under way. robert, the president towed a careful line here. i thought his remarks were interesting. it seems like we're in the middle of what our good friend david axelrod likes to call kabuki theater, confident but not overconfident. i wonder about the deal back and forth between president obama and members of his own congress like bob menendez pushing this renewed sanctions deal. >> i do think you've got the potential collision of a lot of different time lines. the president, i think, is realistic to say there's a possibility of a deal but the deal can long move forward long-term if iranians are willing to do things. if he understands that from colliding time lines politically you've got congressional members from both parties pursuing sanctions. you've got israelis against this deal. i think the one important thing the president has in his pocket, so to speak, the american people are supportive of a deal because they are so incredibl
. and not on the situation. >> the u.n. refugee agency agrees. >> there's more checkpoints in dara and a lot of fighting going on. as you can see, this is a quit location. this is an easier place to come through. >> it will take up to four days for the refugees to get screened, registered and taken to camp. the longer journey, however is yet to start. that is the search for security and human dignity in exile. >> more than 1,000 syrian refugees crossed into jordan in recent days. many walked six miles through the dessert. >> protests in ukraine are in the third week. widespread demonstrations in the capital started after the president backed away from an agreement with the european union. the deal w the deal was -- russia pressured them to sign a deal >> paying tribute to nelson mandela. a live report where a nation continues to honour the man they call father. >> plus, the changes ordered in the wake of last week's deadly commuter train derailment. >> i'm john henry smith. she them the money. someone has. it wasn't the yankees. details ahead in sport. >> start with one issue. add guests from all sides
the mold. jenna: we have the former ambassador to the u.n. speaking with us. so what does the state? >> well, i think that nothing less than the balance of power could be changing in front of our eyes. this assertion of the air defense identification zone extends over the territory well removed from the chinese mainland and in particular it covers islands that are held by anne claimed by japan. so there is a lot of aggressive territorial claims with how other countries respond to it. it will either be a success where they will back off. jenna: how are they doing so far? >> vice president biden was in japan before going on to china. while he said that the chinese declaration of this could lead to mistakes and was dangerous, he did not reject it explicitly, which you should have. the administration told the american civil air carriers to give china notification when their planes transit to avoid mistakes. japan and south korea have told their commercial carriers not to give notice. so anyway, we are acknowledging it. what we want is to resolve this peacefully, but i believe that china
ago, bill richardson, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n., he went to cuba hoping to bring alan gross out of cuba with him. they wouldn't even let him see alan gross. >> that's right. that's right. and he -- they got very upset with some of the words he used when he spoke. and so that was an excuse for him not to visit alan. >> so let's be precise. what would you like president obama to do? >> i think you'd have to ask him what it takes. i want obama to take alan seriously. to take the situation seriously. he's the leader of the nation. he's the one who can go to the state department, to go to the justice department. whatever department's involved and say, let's make this work. he could do it tomorrow if he wanted to. >> but they all have issued statements that they would like alan gross freed. they're doing what they can. but they're not about to release those four cuban prisoners in the united states, if, in fact, that is the cuban demand. >> we don't know if that's the cuban demand, and as far as i'm concerned, and excuse me for sounding angry, but all of those statements have noth
. the top u.n. human rights official is linking bashar al assad to war crimes there. cnn's fred pleitgen has more. >> reporter: they are saying there's evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity by the syrian regime and that responsibility goes all the way up to the office of president assad. the syrian government reacted saying they give no credibility whatsoever to what the u.n. is saying and that the human rights chief has talked, quote, nonsense in the poast. they say that rebels have committed war crimes as well. kate? >> fred, thank you for that. >>> a public health alert in hong kong this morning. the first human case of a new type of bird flu is being reported there after it killed dozens in neighboring china. pauline chao has the story. >> reporter: here in hong kong, authorities are on high alert after confirming the first human case of h7f9 case. she recently slaughtered and ate a chicken in the mainland chinese city of shengxen. human infections of the this strain of bird flu emerged in shanghai this year. back to you, kate. >> it's a killing that shocked britain and the
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)